Traffic Hearing Results

Every fall the Provincetown Board of Selectmen hold their annual traffic hearing where town residents, town boards, selectmen and town staff can submit requests for changes within a town road right-of-way.

This year’s hearing on October 25 had the usual requests for signs and crosswalks as well as a number of bike-related items.

Here’s how the bike requests fared:

The Provincetown 365 request for bike racks was partly approved, with the selectmen agreeing to swap out three parking spaces at the Johnson Street lot for bike racks. They also approved a rack for the Gosnold Street landing near the Julie Heller Gallery and provisionally approved a rack in front of the Police Station on Shank Painter Rd. pending the police chief’s review. The approved bike racks will provide year-round parking for over 40 bicycles.

The Bicycle Committee request to add a fine to the parking regulations for “Obstructing a marked bicycle lane” was approved, with the fine set at $100. There was surprisingly little discussion about this.

The Bicycle Committee request for clarifying signage for the 2-way bike travel on Commercial Street got mired in discussions of prior efforts to put sharrows on the street and in the end the entire proposal was voted down. This was despite staff support for adding “except bicycles” to the “Do not enter” signs and two “no turn” signs along the street. The general attitude seems to be that any sign is unwelcome despite the vast sign clutter that already exists. I was specifically asked if there were signs that could be removed, and indeed I do have a list of outdated, confusing, or plainly unnecessary signs that I will bring back to a future selectmen meeting.

The Bicycle Committee request for climbing lanes on the section of Bradford Street from Franklin Street to Prince Street was tabled. Department of Public Works director Richard Waldo said earlier in the meeting that this section of road will be repaved and the sidewalk repaired in 2017, so there will be an opportunity to consider a new layout as that project moves forward. I asked specifically for guidance from the selectmen on removing parking to make the street safer and was asked to locate alternate parking spaces for those vehicles. The Committee attempted a similar project back in 2012 and had support from over 300 people on a petition, but it never went anywhere.

Finally, a citizen request to restripe the section of Bradford Street Extension where it meets Province Lands Road was supported by the selectmen. There are signs at this location that say “Private Parking” even though the cars are parking in the town right-of-way. The selectmen voted to remove the parking and define the wide bike and pedestrian shoulder with paint.

bradford-st-ext-%22private-parking%22
These cars are parking in the public way on Bradford Street Extension, but the signs say “Private Parking”. Google Maps Streetview, 2011

The next annual traffic hearing will take place in the fall of 2017.

Links:

Provincetown embraces bicycle culture, Provincetown Banner, October 31, 2016.
2016 Annual Traffic Hearing Results, Town of Provincetown web site.

Super busy summer!

There’s been lots happening this summer here in town bikewise.

New pavement markings

In June, the new bike lanes and sharrows were painted on Shank Painter Road, and the new sharrows went in on a short, narrow segment of Conwell Street. Other than the occasional complaint of delivery vehicles parking in the newly-marked lanes and some people who continue to bike in the wrong direction, response has been overwhelmingly positive.

shank painter bike lane conwell street sharrow

New bike racks

In August, racks for 60 bicycles were installed at Court Street and Pearl Street landings. They were immediately filled with bicycles, and my brief chats with folks who were using them were positive. The racks installed are Saris corral racks, which are five inverted-Us mounted to channels. They’re also angled on the channel at 30 degrees, so they take up a little less space than regular perpendicular racks.

2016-bike-racks-phase-2-008Each rack can hold up to 10 bicycles, but the demand for bike parking at Court Street landing had over 60 bikes attached to its four new racks. Previously people locked their bikes here to a railing along the wall, and no more than 25 bikes could fit in that configuration. Concerns about motor vehicles being able to squeeze through past the racks were unfounded, and residents who live on the landing had positive things to say.

The two new racks at Pearl Street Landing were well utilized, though their off-the-beaten-path location meant they were not as heavily used as the Court St. racks.

2016-bike-racks-phase-2-009Along with the new racks, a series of new bike parking signs were installed along Commercial Street to help direct people to the bike parking areas with the most capacity.

These racks were funded by the Bicycle Committee and the Finance Committee and assembled and installed by the Department of Public Works.

We purposely did not mount them to the asphalt so that the Department of Public Works will be able to remove them if need be for snow plowing operations over the winter.

Planning for the bike racks was done by volunteers with Provincetown 365, and that group has a long-term plan that would install up to another 300 bike spaces around town in the next two years.

Education & Outreach

The Bicycle Committee redesigned its bike map & safety guide brochure, and 25,000 copies were printed for the summer season. It includes new cover art, a new map, and updated safety info. They’re available at the bike shops and all over town. The fantastic new cover art Brandon Michael will be used throughout future campaigns.

A series of educational stickers were deployed on all of the town bike racks, with three messages: Did you lock your bike?, Bike Racks Map with a QR code and URL to the online map, and a Public Bike Rack logo to identify the town racks. The stickers faded and scraped off over the course of the summer, so we’re experimenting with a transparent UV film to cover the stickers to see if that will extend their life.

Sharrow educational postcardProvincetown 365 designed a sharrow education poster to let people know that sharrows were coming and distributed over 2,000 sharrow postcards around town. The cards were printed thanks to the financial assistance of the Tourism Office and the Planning Department.

The Bicycle Committee tabled at Firehouse #3 several times during the season and gave out over 100 bike lights, reflective straps, and other swag to anyone who completed the bike safety quiz. The new committee tablecloth made its debut and some extra bike parking signs on hand to show off.

There’s lots of planning work coming up this fall, with the anticipated release of the Outer Cape Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, the Fall Traffic Hearing with requests for more bike racks, bike repair stations, and more.

Bike lane & sharrows approved for Shank Painter Road

At the spring Traffic Hearing on Wednesday, the Board of Selectmen approved the proposal by Provincetown 365 to stripe a bike lane and paint sharrows on Shank Painter Road. This will be the first marked bike lane to be installed by the town.

Proposed bike markings on Shank Painter Road
Proposed bike markings on Shank Painter Road

Town staff recommended the proposal with some changes to the size and placement of the sharrows, citing the narrow road width and speed of traffic on the road as factors. Both the town Bicycle Committee and the Cape Cod Commission were in favor of the proposal.

A bike lane will be painted southbound from Route 6 to Province Road, sharrows will continue southbound to the second Stop & Shop entrance, and then the bike lane will continue to Bradford St. Sharrows will be painted along the entire road northbound from Bradford St. since the existing pavement, while wide in some places, is broken and unsafe for riding.

No budget was identified to pay for this improvement, so that puts into question when it will actually be executed. The selectmen didn’t specify a timeline for the project, either, but in the past the changes approved at the spring traffic hearings tend to get implemented before the summer tourist season begins.

You can watch the entire traffic hearing (including the Cape Cod Commission’s presentation of its Parking & Circulation Study) here on Provincetown Community Television:

The selectmen also approved sharrows in both directions on Conwell St. from Bradford St. to Cemetery Rd. where the planned bike lanes will continue to Route 6. They also directed the DPW staff to request permission from MassDOT to paint sharrows on the section of the road that is controlled by the state.

You can read about all of the other traffic hearing requests in the summary of the hearing’s results on the town web site.

Resources
Traffic Hearing Results, Town of Provincetown
Traffic Hearing Agenda and Meeting Packet, Town of Provincetown
Shank Painter Road Bike Markings flyer, Provincetown 365